New Albany-Floyd County Public Library

cheap nhl snapbacks the price per item is probably one of the first things you’ve looked at. Price is important


What To Look For When Finding A Source Of Wholesale Caps Or Hats

If you’ve been tasked with finding a source of wholesale caps or hats for your business or organization,cheap nhl snapbacks, you’re likely wondering just how to find one. In years past, companies simply opened up their local phone book and found a company that could outsource these products. However, as more wholesalers created an Internet presence for their businesses, organizations found it easier to buy directly from wholesalers. These tips will help ensure you’re working with a quality supplier.

Don’t Be Swayed By Price Alone

If you’re working with a budget, the price per item is probably one of the first things you’ve looked at. Price is important, but shouldn’t be your only consideration when looking for wholesale caps or hats. Instead, consider other factors such as how long the business has been in existence, the quality of the items sold and if there’s a minimum number of items needed to complete your order. Also ask if the business allows you to combine different styles and colors to receive the discounted price, or if the discount only applies when you’re purchasing multiple items of the same style and color.

Look For A Company That Stocks Wholesale Caps Or Hats

Some companies that sell wholesale baseball caps and other hats have a wide inventory in stock at all times,cheap nba snapbacks, while others don’t order from their distributors until they have an order. Buying from a company that keeps an inventory on hand at all times means you’ll be able to receive your order more quickly. It’s inevitable that some products might be out of stock every once in a while, but if the company’s website lists nearly every product as out of stock every time you visit the site,cheap snapbacks hats, keep looking for another source.

Find One That Can Create A Custom Baseball Hat Quickly And Expertly

If you need a custom baseball hat, the company’s embroidery skills and experience is vitally important. After all, you want these wholesale baseball caps to represent your company well and this can’t happen if the embroidery is sloppy or messy. An experienced company will know how to digitize your business’s logo so that it looks great when embroidered on your custom baseball hat. They’ll also be able to recommend certain color combinations,wholesale snapbacks hats, further adding to the professionalism of the finished product.

If you’re in a time crunch, an experienced company is the way to go. These businesses have the knowledge and equipment that’s necessary to get your order completed, packaged and shipped in as little as two weeks. Make sure the business ships via a reputable shipping partner and ask about expedited shipping if you’ve waited too long to place your order.

With just a little research time, you’ll be able to find a quality source of wholesale caps or hats. Think about the price, if the wholesaler is able to keep products in stock and if the business will be able to personalize your custom baseball hat quickly and expertly. Finding a source that sells wholesale baseball caps can help make sure you’re starting a rewarding relationship with a reputable business.

WholesaleHats.com has been providing customers with great prices and service on wholesale baseball caps and wholesale caps or hats since 1979. With more than 30 years of experience, the company can produce a quality,cheap ncaa snapbacks, custom baseball hat in under two weeks. To see a wide selection of products, visit their website.

wholesale snapbacks hats and do an excellent job of keeping your head warm and dry in colder seasons. In addition to this


What Should I Consider When Purchasing Leather Baseball Caps

If you want an elegant, warm and stylish cap, you should consider investing in leather baseball caps. Leather caps are naturally resistant to the elements, are extremely durable, and do an excellent job of keeping your head warm and dry in colder seasons. In addition to this, when the caps have the correct lining, they are also suitable for summer wear. Unlike standard baseball caps, leather hats are durable and are made to last for many years, as they are manufactured with only high quality materials to ensure their durability. However, there are a few things that you should always keep in mind if you are interested in purchasing one of these leather hats.

First, leather baseball caps are expensive compared to cotton, denim,wholesale snapbacks hats, wool or nylon caps. This is due to the higher costs for material and the additional work required to manufacture the caps. The machinery used to build standard caps are typically not suitable for leather caps because the sewing work involved is more difficult than for thinner, flimsier materials. While some of the machines used to make these caps can handle both, machines making the more standard caps are far more common. Due to this, leather hats are harder to locate. It is not uncommon to find hand tooled leather baseball hats, where it is very uncommon to find hand tooled caps made of the more common materials. In addition to this, it is less common for there to be embroidery for leather caps. While it can be done, adding embroidery to leather is often viewed as destructive for the cap, ruining its waterproofing and lowering its durability. It is strongly suggested that you avoid adding patches or embroidery to a good quality leather hat, as it causes the cap not to last as long.

When purchasing leather baseball caps, it is important to remember that these hats are almost always fitted. Because leather is a stiffer material than cotton, wool or even denim, the caps do not mold to adjusters well. As this is the case, you will need to take your hat size so that you can purchase the best sized cap for you. When you take your measurement,cheap snapbacks, you should make certain to use a flexible measuring tape, like the ones you would find in a sewing kit. These tapes take the best size,2014 new snapback, so that you can have the best fit possible. Make certain that you wear your hair the way you usually do when you wear caps so that your measurement takes into account the thickness of your hair.

When you place your order for your leather baseball caps, you will need to decide on the type of lining that will go into the cap. Unlike standard caps,cheap snapback hats, which do not typically require a lining, leather caps need a lining. You can choose a thin lining for summer use,wholesale snapbacks, or thicker linings for spring, fall and winter use. In most cases, you will want several caps to match the seasons, as a winter cap in the summer can cause your head to be exceptionally hot. Leather hats should be treated against water damage and cleaned seasonally so that the leather maintains its good color and health.

The Life of Harlan Hubbard


Thursday, October 9, 2014

5:30 – 6:30 pm

Strassweg Auditorium

 

Local artist Paul Hassfurder will be coming to the library to give a lecture about the life of local artist and legend Harlan Hubbard and his wife Anna. Harlan Hubbard, as well as being a prolific artist, is probably best known for his “Thoreauesque” lifestyle where he and his wife spent seven years drifting down the Ohio River on their homemade shanty boat. Through his use of images and his personal relationship with the Hubbards Paul Hassfurder will elaborate on the Hubbard’s and how important their journey, and their lives are to the Ohio River Valley.

Abraham Lincoln @ the Library


Thursday, October 16, 2014

7:00 – 8:00 pm

Strassweg Auditorium

 

Larry Elliott will portray Abraham Lincoln. During his presentation at the NA-FC Public Library, Elliott’s portrayal of Abraham Lincoln will include a story about a trip he took down the Ohio River on a steamboat, to tie in with steamboat the Belle of Louisville’s 100th birthday celebration October 14-19, 2014. This program is free and open to the public.

Abraham Lincoln was born in Hodgenville, KY, and presenter Larry Elliott’s family is from there as well. In 2003 he entered a Lincoln look-a-like contest in Hodgenville and began reading about this great man. After an extensive study of his life, Elliott decided to purchase a complete period-correct Abraham Lincoln costume and began portraying him. In 2005, he learned, remarkably, that his great, great, great, grandmother (Mary LaRue Enlow) was the midwife who helped deliver Abraham Lincoln. Elliott portrays Mr. Lincoln in the first person, from his humble roots in Kentucky, to growing up in Indiana, to becoming a self-taught lawyer in Illinois, to becoming our sixteenth President who preserved the Union and freed the slaves, to his untimely death at Ford’s Theatre. Larry Elliott and his wife Mary (who often portrays Mary Todd Lincoln to Larry’s Abraham Lincoln) live in Louisville, KY. They are both members of the Association of Lincoln Presenters.

First Families History & Heritage Celebration


Join us for A History and Heritage Celebration, the premiere event of First Families of Floyd, Clark, and Harrison Counties. The public is invited to visit between 6 and 7 PM to enjoy frontier period entertainment and light refreshments; meet re-enactors of tri-county citizens, genealogists and historians; and view county history displays. Attendees are welcome to dress in pioneer costume.

At 7 PM, First Families certificates to those who have proved direct descent from an ancestor living in Floyd, Clark or Harrison County prior to 1841. Living historian Mandy Dick will present as her first family ancestor, Elizabeth Pennington, and tell her amazing story of kidnap by Indians, return to her Harrison County family, marriage to one of Indiana’s founders, and her influence on the writing of Indiana’s state constitution. The celebration is co-sponsored by the Southern Indiana Genealogical Society and the Library’s Stuart B. Wrege Indiana History Room.

200 Years of Steamboat History!


Come join the New Albany-Floyd County Public Library on Thursday, October 16th at 7pm for 200 Years of Steamboat History! 

This great event is free and open to the public!

Dr. Larry Debuhr, of the Rivers Institute at Hanover College, will talk about the history of steamboats.

We hope that you can join us! 

First Families History & Heritage Celebration


First Families

History & Heritage Celebration

Join us for A History and Heritage Celebration, the premiere event of First Families of Floyd, Clark, and Harrison Counties. The public is invited to visit between 6 and 7 PM to enjoy frontier period entertainment and light refreshments; meet re-enactors of tri-county citizens, genealogists and historians; and view county history displays. Attendees are welcome to dress in pioneer costume.

At 7 PM, First Families certificates will be awarded to those who have proved direct descent from an ancestor living in Floyd, Clark or Harrison County prior to 1841. Living historian Mandy Dick will present as her first family ancestor, Elizabeth Pennington, and tell her amazing story of kidnap by Indians, return to her Harrison County family, marriage to one of Indiana’s founders, and her influence on the writing of Indiana’s state constitution. The celebration is co-sponsored by the Southern Indiana Genealogical Society and the Library’s Stuart B. Wrege Indiana History Room.

 

Date:  October 2, 2014

Time:  6:00-8:00 pm

Place:  Strassweg Auditorium, New Albany-Floyd County Public Library

 

Meet & Mingle October


Will & Estate Planning

 The New Albany-Floyd County Public Library is hosting the monthly Midday Meet & Mingle at 11:30 a.m. on Monday, October 20th in the Strassweg Auditorium. Steve Naville, from Lorch Naville Ward Law Firm, will be the presenter. Mr. Naville will be speaking on and answering questions relating to Will & Estate Planning. The public is invited to learn more about estate planning basics, probate, what happens without a will, living wills, and trusts.

Join us for coffee and refreshments! Questions? visit or call the Reference Services Desk at 949-3523.

 www.nafclibrary.org

 

George Morrison Collection


Summary Information

Title: George Morrison Collection

Inclusive Dates:  1849-1962

Creator: Various

Call Number: IR MSS 811

Quantity: 8 Folders

Repository: The Stuart B. Wrege Indiana History Room

Archival Location: 180 West Spring Street, New Albany, Indiana 47150

Language: English

Biography/Historical Note:

The fact that Morrison’s legacy lives on even today is testament to not only the great popularity he witnessed during his lifetime, but the fact that he was also exceptionally talented. Of course, like many memorable New Albanians, the painter wasn’t born a Hoosier. In 1820, Morrison entered this world as a Baltimorean. Several sources state that here he received his first formal training in the arts; with some believing he studied under the famed Maryland artists Rembrandt and Raphael Peale.

As was the custom of the time, a young Morrison packed up his brushes and easel and made his way out west to Connersville. One year later in 1840, the 20-year-old had for reasons unknown migrated to New Albany. Eventually a pretty local girl by the name of Lydia Maynard would catch his eye and his heart. Living their lives overlooking the Ohio on a robust property in Silver Hills, the couple had two children, a boy and a girl. Both went on to become artists themselves.

Yet, unlike his children, back when a young Morrison arrived in New Albany, no family support existed for him. Undeterred from his aspiration, he opened a studio and began to promote his business.

“He announced his arrival with a small advertisement in the New Albany Gazette and invited the public to examine specimens of his work at his studio on Main Street near Bank,” said a transcript from a 1970’s radio program about Morrison from The Historical Society and posted on the New Albany-Floyd County Public Library’s website. “The public liked what they saw, for commissions began coming in and many of the portraits he painted are still prize possessions of New Albany families.”

For more than 50 years, the city’s most famous artist did what he did best — he painted. Many prominent citizens of the age had their portraits done by Morrison. Owning the paintings back then represented more than just a fine appreciation for the arts. Possessing a framed piece meant you also had the affluence to afford to commission one. Even now, the paintings allow today’s viewers an insight into what well-off Victorians found important.

“Morrison had a knack of instilling his subjects with appearances of tranquility, making the finished product of each portrait appear inviting to viewers,” said David Condra in a transcription of a 2012 talk he gave entitled “George Morrison: New Albany’s 19th Century Portrait and Landscape Artist.” “The face is the focal point of each portrait, with hair and clothing commanding attention as well. Hair, clothing, jewelry painted in a subject’s portrait created a visual biography of that person, such as socio-economic status and cultural values.”

Perhaps his most famous painting was that of New Albany resident and Indiana’s 11th governor, Ashabel P. Willard, which still hangs in the Statehouse. To better understand Morrison’s style without traveling to Indianapolis, check out the NAFC Library. His works dot the hallways near the Indiana room. Four pieces damaged by vandals also remain in storage.

In addition to portraits, the local library has preserved some of Morrison’s landscape paintings. His view from Silver Hills inspired him to create a fantastic aerial view of New Albany, complete with riverboats sailing — and even one sinking — down the Ohio. Due to the prevalent river trade with the South, it’s been rumored that his paintings have been found as far away as New Orleans. For a time, the artist spent winters in the bayou city. But eventually, times would change for both the city and its famous inhabitant.

“Following the Civil War, New Albany’s economic boom ceased because of the decline in trade with the South,” said Estill Curtis Pennington in the book “Lessons in Likeness Portrait Painters in Kentucky and the Ohio River Valley 1802-1920.” “While Morrison’s portrait commissions dwindled in the face of competition from photography, he continued to be an active landscape and still-life painter whose work was much in demand.”

Painting well into his final years, sometimes with the use of a photograph to guide his work, Morrison died in December 1893 and was interred on his Silver Hills estate. Later, his body would be moved to Fairview Cemetery.

While always painting for the wealthy citizens of New Albany and gaining commercial success, the man whose obituary chronicled him as quiet and reserved in his manners would never become affluent himself. But money couldn’t have bought the artist his enduring legacy or the lingering historical significance of his paintings, something a local newspaper covering one of his landscape paintings hinted out more than 150 years ago.

“Twenty years hence this picture will be invaluable — when generations yet to be born will gaze with astonishment at the rapid growth of a city destined to become the great commercial emporium of the West, which is now but in her infancy,” said a reporter from a March 1853 edition of the New Albany Daily Ledger. “We hope all will go and see it.”

Taken verbatim from “New Albany Bicentennial: George Morrison” by Amanda Beam which appeared in the New Albany

Scope and Content Note:

The collection is an accrual of items about George Morrison. Of special interest there is information from Avesta Shields Nunnemacher who knew George Morrison personally while living on Silver Hills in New Albany. She wrote a bio of Morrison in 1919 and sent it to the library.

Arrangement:

Since it’s a subject collection and there really wasn’t an original order folders were put in alphabetical order inside the box.

Related Subject Terms:

  • Morrison, George W.
  • Art & Artists

Related Material:

  • George Morrison Biography File
  • Indiana Room Art Collection

Administrative/Restriction Information:

Access Restrictions:

There are no access restrictions on the materials, and the collection is open to all members of the public in accordance with state law.

Use Restrictions:

The researcher assumes full responsibility for conforming to the laws of libel, privacy, and copyright of the state of Indiana which may be involved in the use of this collection.

Acquisition Information:

Accrued by library staff in the early to mid 1900’s.

Processing Information

Processed by, Matt Eidem, September, 2014

Contents List:

Box Title Folder
SC 006 An Evening with George Morrison Historical Society Program, 1994 01
SC 006 Bios Written by Avesta Shields Nunemacher, 1916 02
SC 006 Emma Carleton Letter about George Morrison and her Mother, 1916 03
SC 006 Harold Vawter Letter about Morrison Self-Portrait, 1938 04
SC 006 Kit Carson, 1962 05
SC 006 Painting Info, Undated 06
SC 006 Wilbur Peat Inquiring About 07
SC 006 Tribune Article on Morrison House Burning Down, 1849 08

Charles Prosser Collection


Summary Information

Title: Charles Prosser Collection

Inclusive Dates: 1900 – 1977

Creator: Charles Prosser and various others

Call Number: IR MSS 812

Quantity: 7 folders

Repository: The Stuart B. Wrege Indiana History Room

Archival Location: 180 West Spring Street, New Albany, Indiana 47150

Language: English

Biography/Historical Note:

Charles Allen Prosser, son of Reese William and Sarah Emma Prosser, was born at New Albany, Idiana on Sept 20, 1871, and graduated from De Pauw University in 1897, receiving the A.M. degree in 1906 and PHD in 1919. In 1898 he graduated from the law school of the University of Louisville. In 1915 he received a PHD from Columbia University and he also received honorary degrees from various institutions. He married Zerelda A. Huckeby on December 30th 1896.

 

After teaching in the New Albany Public Schools he served as superintendent from 1900 to 1908. In 1909-1910 he was superintendent of the Children’s Aid Society in New York, from 1910 to 1912 assistant commissioner of education for Massachusetts, and after 1915 director of William Hood Dunwoody Institute in Minneapolis. He lectured at various colleges and universities.

Information taken from Who’s Who in America

Scope and Content Note:

The Prosser Collection is an Accrual of items about him. The most notable item in the collection is a program of lectures that Charles Prosser was offering in the early 1900’s.

Arrangement:

Items are arranged alphabetically since as an accrual there is really no original order to the materials.

Related Subject Terms:

  • Vocational Education
  • Prosser, Charles A.
  • Schools, New Albany (Ind.)

Administrative/Restriction Information:

Access Restrictions:

There are no access restrictions on the materials, and the collection is open to all members of the public in accordance with state law.

Use Restrictions:

The researcher assumes full responsibility for conforming to the laws of libel, privacy, and copyright of the state of Indiana which may be involved in the use of this collection.

Acquisition Information:

Processing Information

Processed by, Matt Eidem, September, 2014

Contents List:

Box Title Folder
SC 006 Historical Information offered by Earl Hedden, 1967 01
SC 006 Ledger Book Page (photo copy), undated 02
SC 006 New Year’s Greeting, 1908 03
SC 006 Program of Lectures Charles Prosser Offered, undated 04
SC 006 Snippet from Tribune when Prosser was named Superintendent, 1900 05
SC 006 Valley News Article On Charles Prosser getting a Chicago High School named for him, 1960 06
SC 006 Vocational Center Dedication Program, 1969 07