.

First Families History & Heritage Celebration


First Families

History & Heritage Celebration

Join us for A History and Heritage Celebration, the premiere event of First Families of Floyd, Clark, and Harrison Counties. The public is invited to visit between 6 and 7 PM to enjoy frontier period entertainment and light refreshments; meet re-enactors of tri-county citizens, genealogists and historians; and view county history displays. Attendees are welcome to dress in pioneer costume.

At 7 PM, First Families certificates will be awarded to those who have proved direct descent from an ancestor living in Floyd, Clark or Harrison County prior to 1841. Living historian Mandy Dick will present as her first family ancestor, Elizabeth Pennington, and tell her amazing story of kidnap by Indians, return to her Harrison County family, marriage to one of Indiana’s founders, and her influence on the writing of Indiana’s state constitution. The celebration is co-sponsored by the Southern Indiana Genealogical Society and the Library’s Stuart B. Wrege Indiana History Room.

 

Date:  October 2, 2014

Time:  6:00-8:00 pm

Place:  Strassweg Auditorium, New Albany-Floyd County Public Library

 

George Morrison Collection


Summary Information

Title: George Morrison Collection

Inclusive Dates:  1849-1962

Creator: Various

Call Number: IR MSS 811

Quantity: 8 Folders

Repository: The Stuart B. Wrege Indiana History Room

Archival Location: 180 West Spring Street, New Albany, Indiana 47150

Language: English

Biography/Historical Note:

The fact that Morrison’s legacy lives on even today is testament to not only the great popularity he witnessed during his lifetime, but the fact that he was also exceptionally talented. Of course, like many memorable New Albanians, the painter wasn’t born a Hoosier. In 1820, Morrison entered this world as a Baltimorean. Several sources state that here he received his first formal training in the arts; with some believing he studied under the famed Maryland artists Rembrandt and Raphael Peale.

As was the custom of the time, a young Morrison packed up his brushes and easel and made his way out west to Connersville. One year later in 1840, the 20-year-old had for reasons unknown migrated to New Albany. Eventually a pretty local girl by the name of Lydia Maynard would catch his eye and his heart. Living their lives overlooking the Ohio on a robust property in Silver Hills, the couple had two children, a boy and a girl. Both went on to become artists themselves.

Yet, unlike his children, back when a young Morrison arrived in New Albany, no family support existed for him. Undeterred from his aspiration, he opened a studio and began to promote his business.

“He announced his arrival with a small advertisement in the New Albany Gazette and invited the public to examine specimens of his work at his studio on Main Street near Bank,” said a transcript from a 1970’s radio program about Morrison from The Historical Society and posted on the New Albany-Floyd County Public Library’s website. “The public liked what they saw, for commissions began coming in and many of the portraits he painted are still prize possessions of New Albany families.”

For more than 50 years, the city’s most famous artist did what he did best — he painted. Many prominent citizens of the age had their portraits done by Morrison. Owning the paintings back then represented more than just a fine appreciation for the arts. Possessing a framed piece meant you also had the affluence to afford to commission one. Even now, the paintings allow today’s viewers an insight into what well-off Victorians found important.

“Morrison had a knack of instilling his subjects with appearances of tranquility, making the finished product of each portrait appear inviting to viewers,” said David Condra in a transcription of a 2012 talk he gave entitled “George Morrison: New Albany’s 19th Century Portrait and Landscape Artist.” “The face is the focal point of each portrait, with hair and clothing commanding attention as well. Hair, clothing, jewelry painted in a subject’s portrait created a visual biography of that person, such as socio-economic status and cultural values.”

Perhaps his most famous painting was that of New Albany resident and Indiana’s 11th governor, Ashabel P. Willard, which still hangs in the Statehouse. To better understand Morrison’s style without traveling to Indianapolis, check out the NAFC Library. His works dot the hallways near the Indiana room. Four pieces damaged by vandals also remain in storage.

In addition to portraits, the local library has preserved some of Morrison’s landscape paintings. His view from Silver Hills inspired him to create a fantastic aerial view of New Albany, complete with riverboats sailing — and even one sinking — down the Ohio. Due to the prevalent river trade with the South, it’s been rumored that his paintings have been found as far away as New Orleans. For a time, the artist spent winters in the bayou city. But eventually, times would change for both the city and its famous inhabitant.

“Following the Civil War, New Albany’s economic boom ceased because of the decline in trade with the South,” said Estill Curtis Pennington in the book “Lessons in Likeness Portrait Painters in Kentucky and the Ohio River Valley 1802-1920.” “While Morrison’s portrait commissions dwindled in the face of competition from photography, he continued to be an active landscape and still-life painter whose work was much in demand.”

Painting well into his final years, sometimes with the use of a photograph to guide his work, Morrison died in December 1893 and was interred on his Silver Hills estate. Later, his body would be moved to Fairview Cemetery.

While always painting for the wealthy citizens of New Albany and gaining commercial success, the man whose obituary chronicled him as quiet and reserved in his manners would never become affluent himself. But money couldn’t have bought the artist his enduring legacy or the lingering historical significance of his paintings, something a local newspaper covering one of his landscape paintings hinted out more than 150 years ago.

“Twenty years hence this picture will be invaluable — when generations yet to be born will gaze with astonishment at the rapid growth of a city destined to become the great commercial emporium of the West, which is now but in her infancy,” said a reporter from a March 1853 edition of the New Albany Daily Ledger. “We hope all will go and see it.”

Taken verbatim from “New Albany Bicentennial: George Morrison” by Amanda Beam which appeared in the New Albany

Scope and Content Note:

The collection is an accrual of items about George Morrison. Of special interest there is information from Avesta Shields Nunnemacher who knew George Morrison personally while living on Silver Hills in New Albany. She wrote a bio of Morrison in 1919 and sent it to the library.

Arrangement:

Since it’s a subject collection and there really wasn’t an original order folders were put in alphabetical order inside the box.

Related Subject Terms:

  • Morrison, George W.
  • Art & Artists

Related Material:

  • George Morrison Biography File
  • Indiana Room Art Collection

Administrative/Restriction Information:

Access Restrictions:

There are no access restrictions on the materials, and the collection is open to all members of the public in accordance with state law.

Use Restrictions:

The researcher assumes full responsibility for conforming to the laws of libel, privacy, and copyright of the state of Indiana which may be involved in the use of this collection.

Acquisition Information:

Accrued by library staff in the early to mid 1900’s.

Processing Information

Processed by, Matt Eidem, September, 2014

Contents List:

Box Title Folder
SC 006 An Evening with George Morrison Historical Society Program, 1994 01
SC 006 Bios Written by Avesta Shields Nunemacher, 1916 02
SC 006 Emma Carleton Letter about George Morrison and her Mother, 1916 03
SC 006 Harold Vawter Letter about Morrison Self-Portrait, 1938 04
SC 006 Kit Carson, 1962 05
SC 006 Painting Info, Undated 06
SC 006 Wilbur Peat Inquiring About 07
SC 006 Tribune Article on Morrison House Burning Down, 1849 08

Charles Prosser Collection


Summary Information

Title: Charles Prosser Collection

Inclusive Dates: 1900 – 1977

Creator: Charles Prosser and various others

Call Number: IR MSS 812

Quantity: 7 folders

Repository: The Stuart B. Wrege Indiana History Room

Archival Location: 180 West Spring Street, New Albany, Indiana 47150

Language: English

Biography/Historical Note:

Charles Allen Prosser, son of Reese William and Sarah Emma Prosser, was born at New Albany, Idiana on Sept 20, 1871, and graduated from De Pauw University in 1897, receiving the A.M. degree in 1906 and PHD in 1919. In 1898 he graduated from the law school of the University of Louisville. In 1915 he received a PHD from Columbia University and he also received honorary degrees from various institutions. He married Zerelda A. Huckeby on December 30th 1896.

 

After teaching in the New Albany Public Schools he served as superintendent from 1900 to 1908. In 1909-1910 he was superintendent of the Children’s Aid Society in New York, from 1910 to 1912 assistant commissioner of education for Massachusetts, and after 1915 director of William Hood Dunwoody Institute in Minneapolis. He lectured at various colleges and universities.

Information taken from Who’s Who in America

Scope and Content Note:

The Prosser Collection is an Accrual of items about him. The most notable item in the collection is a program of lectures that Charles Prosser was offering in the early 1900’s.

Arrangement:

Items are arranged alphabetically since as an accrual there is really no original order to the materials.

Related Subject Terms:

  • Vocational Education
  • Prosser, Charles A.
  • Schools, New Albany (Ind.)

Administrative/Restriction Information:

Access Restrictions:

There are no access restrictions on the materials, and the collection is open to all members of the public in accordance with state law.

Use Restrictions:

The researcher assumes full responsibility for conforming to the laws of libel, privacy, and copyright of the state of Indiana which may be involved in the use of this collection.

Acquisition Information:

Processing Information

Processed by, Matt Eidem, September, 2014

Contents List:

Box Title Folder
SC 006 Historical Information offered by Earl Hedden, 1967 01
SC 006 Ledger Book Page (photo copy), undated 02
SC 006 New Year’s Greeting, 1908 03
SC 006 Program of Lectures Charles Prosser Offered, undated 04
SC 006 Snippet from Tribune when Prosser was named Superintendent, 1900 05
SC 006 Valley News Article On Charles Prosser getting a Chicago High School named for him, 1960 06
SC 006 Vocational Center Dedication Program, 1969 07

Library Book Sale- September 6th


Dear Friends and Book Lovers,

 

I’ve decided to start off each newsletter with our hours of operation, just so you know: Saturday, September 6, we will be open from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the Annex Building in the library’s large parking lot.

 

On the Special Sale Table:

 

Saturday is our annual Kentuckiana Day Book Sale and for children, we have an appropriate book on display: JOURNEY TO THE BOTTOMLESS PIT: THE STORY OF STEPHEN BISHOP AND MAMMOTH CAVE by Elizabeth Mitchell. Bishop was a young slave who began giving tours of the cave when he was seventeen in 1838. This is a fascinating story for young readers.

 

Year books from local schools include one for Mt. Tabor Elementary School, a 1986 Vista and many Blotters. They will all be selling for half price. There will be many New Albany Sesquicentennial pamphlets selling for only 5 cents or for free.

 

You’ll find many black & white sketches of local places on the table, including one of the first state capital in Corydon, St. Mary of the Knobs by Carol Tobe, Silver Creek at Spring Street by Mary Lou Hess and New Albany Landmarks by James Russell. Except for the large Corydon picture, which will sell at half-price for $2.50, the other smaller ones, for which there are many duplicates, will sell for only 50 cents.

 

Books in the Large Print section will also sell for half price.

 

Choice Selections Fiction: BORN OF SHADOWS by Sherrilynn Kenyon; SUSPICION OF RAGE by Barbara Parker (signed); SHARP OBJECTS and DARK PLACES by Gillian Flynn, famous for GONE GIRL; TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD by Harper Lee; THE BENEDICTION OF BROTHER CADFAEL, a handsome hardback containing the first two mysteries in Ellis Peters’ Brotehr Cadfael series, A MORBID TASTE FOR BONES and ONE CORPSE TOO MANY, plus many color photos of Cadfael’s countryside in England; MOVING TARGET by J. A. Jance; RED MIST by Patricia Cornwell; SPIDER BONES by Kathy Reichs; WHISKEY BEACH by Nora Roberts; and TWICE BORN by Margaret Mazzantini.

 

Choice Selections Non-Fiction: QUIET: THE POWER OF INTROVERTS IN A WORLD THAT CAN’T STOP TALKING by Susan Cain; THE OXFORD COMPANION TO UNITED STATES HISTORY, edited by Paul Boyer; THE OXFORD ILLUSTRATED COMPANION TO THE BIBLE, edited by Bruce Metzger and Michael Coogan; THE COMPLETE GUIDE TO THE BIBLE from Reader’s Digest; AN AMERICAN CELEBRATION: THE ART OF CHARLES WYNSOCKI by Betty Ballantine; THE SECRET by Rhonda Byrne; THE POWER OF NEGATIVE THINKING by Bob Knight; THE END OF YOUR LIFE BOOK CLUB by Will Schwalbe; PROOF OF HEAVEN: A NEUROSURGEON’S JOURNEY INTO THE AFTERLIFE by Eben Alexander; HEALING WITH THE VOICE by James D’Angelo; SOWBELLY AND SOURDOUGH: ORIGINAL RECIPES FROM THE TRAIL DRIVES AND COW CAMPS OF THE 1800s by Scott Gregory; and TITANIC: AN ILLUSTRATED HISTORY by Don Lynch with paintings by Ken Marschall.

 

Animals & Pets: THE MAN WHO LISTENED TO HORSES by Monty Roberts.

 

Art: EGYPTIAN PAINTING by Arpag Mekhitarian; AMERICA’S FOLK ART, edited by Robert Polley; EGYPTIAN JEWELLRY by Milada Vilimkova; THE ART OF ANCIENT IRAN by Roman Ghirshman; FINE ART REPRODUCTIONS OF OLD AND MODERN MASTERS; THE WORLD OF WATTEAU by Pierre Schneider; SARGENT WATERCOLORS by Donelson Hoopes; MARY CASSATT: PAINTING AND PRINTS by Frank Getlein; and IMPRESSIONIST AND POST-IMPRESSIONIST MASTERPIECES AT THE MUSEE D’ORSAY by Genevieve Lacambre (these last three feature large full-page full-color reproductions).

 

Biography: THE INTERESTING NARRATIVE OF THE LIFE OF OLAUDA EQUIANO, OR GUSTAVUS VASS, WRITTEN BY HIMSELF, edited by Werner Sollors and R.E. LEE by Douglas Southall Freeman in four volumes.

 

Christian Fiction: TILLY by Frank Peretti; SAFELY HOME by Randy Alcorn; GRACE IN THINE EYES by Liz Curtis Higgs; ANGEL FIRE by Mary Marshall; a number of paperbacks withdrawn from the library by Beverly Lewis; THE HAVEN by Suzanne Woods Fisher; and THE GIRL IN THE GATEHOUSE by Julie Klassen.

 

Classics: THE HEART IS A LONELY HUNTER by Carson McCullers; THE ADVENTURES OF SHERLOCK HOLMES by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle; TREASURE ISLAND by Robert Louis Stevenson; THE PORTABLE JAMES JOYCE; UNCLE TOM’S CABIN by Harriet Beecher Stowe; THE WAYFARER by Natsume Soseki: THE ENDURING HEMINGWAY, edited by Charles Scribner, Jr.; TORTILLA FLAT & OF MICE AND MEN by John Steinbeck; and MIDDLEMARCH, in a nice mass market paperback, by George Eliot (I read it this summer and just loved it).

 

Cookbooks: A nice copy of the 75th anniversary edition of THE JOY OF COOKING by Rombauer and Becker and THE COMPLETE STEP-BY-STEP COOKBOOK: MORE THAN 800 RECIPES IN FULL COLOR from the Salamander Press.

 

Crafts, Hobbies & Collectibles: For those of you who are interested in antique firearms, we have THE PEACEMAKER AND ITS RIVALS: AN ACCOUNT OF THE SINGLE ACTION COLT by John Parsons; THE LURE OF ANTIQUE ARMS by Merrill Lindsay; and AUTOMATIC ARMS: THEIR HISTORY, DEVELOPMENT AND USE by Melvin Johnson.

 

For crochet enthusiasts, we have 30 CLASSIC BLOCKS FOR CROCHET PROJECTS by Linda Schapper and HEARTS TO STITCH AND CRAFT from Better Homes and Gardens.

 

Erotic Fiction: BARED TO YOU by Sylvia Day.

 

Fiction: We have all six volumes in Jean Auel’s Children of the Earth series, in hardbacks with dust jackets; THE GLASS LAKE by Maeve Binchy; FINDING EMILIE, an interesting French historical novel by Laurel Corona; THE DESCENDANTS, which the George Clooney movie was based on, by Kani Hart Hemmings; MARTHA PEAKE: A NOVEL OF THE REVOLUTION by Patrick McGarth; THE QUEEN’S FOOL by Philippa Gregory; THE EMANCIPATOR’S WIFE: A NOVEL OF MARY TODD LINCOLN by Barbara Hambly; THE KITE RUNNER by Khaled Hosseini; MEMOIRS OF A GEISHA by Arthur Golden (a good example of an excellent book that was made into a mediocre movie); HOUSE RULES by Jodi Picoult; THE WITCH OF PORTOBELLO by Paul Coelho; and THE LAST SONG by Nicholas Sparks.

 

Foreign Language: We have several magazines in German on airplanes (FLUGZEUG) that might be of interest to the history buff, especially if you know a little German.

 

Gardening: MAKE-OVERS FROM THE BUDGET GARDENER by Maureen Gilmer; HANGING BASKETS: A STEP-BY-STEP GUIDE by Jenny Hendy and Neil Sutherly; and A SAMPLER OF WAYSIDE HERBS: REDISCOVERING OLD USES FOR FAMILIAR WILD PLANTS by Barbara Pond.

 

History: CHINA: A HISTORY IN ART by Bradley Smith and Wan-go; THIRTEEN DAYS: A MEMOIR OF THE CUBAN MISSILE CRISIS by Robert Kennedy; THE DISPOSSESSED: AMERICA’S UNDERCLASSES FROM THE CIVIL WAR TO THE PRESENT by Jacqueline Jones; NAPOLEON’S BUTTONS: HOW 17 MOLECULES CHANGED HISTORY by Penny Le Couteur and Jay Burreson; SAILOR FROM OKLAHOMA: ONE MAN’S TWO-OCEAN WAR by Floyd Beaver; and several Command magazines which deal with military history, strategy and analysis.

 

Horror: DEAD UNTIL DARK and DEAD TO THE WORLD by Charlaine Harris (the HBO series TRUE BLOOD is based on these).

 

Humor & Commentary: THE FAR SIDE GALLERY by Gary Larson.

 

Kentuckiana: OLD KENTUCKY ARCHITECTURE by Rexford Newcomb; THE SEVEN STOREY MOUNTAIN by Thomas Merton; and FLIGHT BEHAVIOR by Barbara Kingsolver.

 

Large Print: RASPUTIN’S DAUGHTER by Robert Alexander and The Large Print Bible from Reader’s Digest, Volume I (Genesis to Job) and Volume III (The New Testament).

 

Mystery: LUCKY YOU and SICK PUPPY by Carl Hiaasen, who will be appearing at the Louisville Collegiate School to do a signing of his newest book SKINK—NO SURRENDER on September 30—tickets can be purchased through Carmichaels Booksellers; BELLADONNA AT BELSTONE, a very good Knights Templar mystery by Michael Jecks set in a medieval convent; TOP SECRET TWENTY-ONE by Janet Evanovich; many, many books in the Brother Cadfael series by Ellis Peters; THE CRIMES OF CHARLOTTE BRONTE, a novel by true crime writer James Tully; and KILLING FLOOR by Lee Child.

 

New Age & Parapsychology: A COURSE IN MIRACLES from the Foundation for Inner Peace.

 

New & Notable: THE PATH OF THE DREAM HEALER: MY JOURNEY THROUGH THE MIRACULOUS WORLD OF ENERGY HEALING by Adam; SECRETS OF THE TITANIC, a documentary on VHS tape from National Geographic; five Godzilla movies on VHS tape in slipcase; and I have put out NIGHT FALLS FAST: UNDERSTANDING SUICIDE by Kay Redfield Jamison here for those who have been sobered by Robin Williams’ recent passing along with her AN UNQUIET MIND, which is an excellent memoir of her own manic-depressive illness.

 

Nora Roberts Fans: We have some very nice books by Nora, including the Bride Quartet, but we also have many, many Debbie Macomber paperbacks! Come early as these sell out fast.

 

Reference & Business: THE MONEY BOOK FOR THE YOUNG, FABULOUS AND BROKE by Suze Orman.

 

Religion: SHEER JOY by Matthew Fox; MY UTMOST FOR HIS HIGHEST by Oswald Chambers; VIRGIN MARY’S BAYSIDE PROPHECIES Volumes 1-5 by Veronica Leuken; THE MIRACLE OF BERNADETTE by Margaret Gray Blanton; ANGELS and HOW TO BE BORN AGAIN, in one volume, by Billy Graham; and FRESH WIND, FRESH FIRE: WHAT HAPPENS WHEN GOD’S SPIRIT INVADES THE HEARTS OF HIS PEOPLE by Jim Cymbala.

 

Television: FIFTY YEARS AT THE GRAND OLE OPRY by Myron Tassin and Jerry Henderson.

 

Westerns & American Indians: ANGEL PEAK by Peter Dawson; RAY MANLEY’S PORTRAITS AND TURQUOISE OF SOUTHWEST INDIANS with text by Clara Lee Tanner; AMERICAN INDIAN FOOD AND LORE: 150 AUTHENTIC RECIPES by Carolyn Niethaminer; and many Western hardbacks withdrawn from the library by writers such as Todhunter Ballard and Clifford Blair.

 

Audio Books on CD: FRONTIER FIGHTER: TRUE STORIES OF THE EXPLORERS, PIONEERS AND ADVENTURERS WHO TAMED THE AMERICAN WEST (this is shelved in our Western section).

 

Audio Books on Tape: THE RETURN OF THE KING by J. R. R. Tolkien.

 

Music CDs: We’ve received a really large donation of music CDs. Here are just a few of the items of the most interest: GERSHWIN: SUPER HITS; MOZART 46 SYMPHONIES; JOHNNY CASH, ULTIMATE GOSPEL; DOLLY PARTON: THOSE WERE THE DAYS; BOB SEGER’S GREATEST HITS; COUNT BASIE: THE CLASSIC COUNT; THE VERY BEST OF MEAT LOAF; WHITNEY HOUSTON: GREATEST HITS; many CDs of organ music; and LIQUID SILK: THE FEMININE VOICE OF THE NATIVE FLUTE by Marina Raye (this is shelved with our American Indian books).

 

VHS Tapes: FROM RUSSIA WITH LOVE and THUNDERBALL with Sean Connery; LIVE AND LET DIE, MOONRAKER and FOR YOUR EYES ONLY with Roger Moore; BATMAN AND ROBIN with George Clooney; TWISTER with Helen Hunt; TITANIC with Barbara Stanwyck; DR. DOOLITTLE with Eddie Murphy; and APOLLO 13 with Tom Hanks.

 

FOR THE CHILDREN

 

Children’s VHS Tapes: We’ve received a generous donation of wonderful children’s movies on VHS tape. Here are just a few of the titles: 101 DALMATIONS, both the animated version and the live-action movie with Glenn Close; ANTZ; BABE; THE BLACK CAULDRON; THE BORROWERS with John Goodman; MUPPET TREASURE ISLAND and MUPPET CLASSIC THEATER; MADELINE IN PARIS; also from Walt Disney—CINDERELLA, FUN AND FANCY FREE, THE GOOFY MOVIE, JAMES AND THE GIANT PEACH, OLIVER & COMPANY, SONG OF THE SOUTH, WIND IN THE WILLOWS and THE THREE LITTLE PIGS. We also have the first six episodes in THE LAND BEFORE TIME movies and many more, including a slipcase set with THE RELUCTANT DRAGON, THE WALT DISNEY STORY and FRANK AND OLLIE. Finally there’s a tape of TEENAGE MUTANT NINJA TURTLES: THE MOVIE from 1990. You can compare it to the current smash hit.

 

Something Special: MY FIRST FAIRY PORTFOLIO, with stickers, stencils and models to create fairy fashion.

 

Board Books and Other Books for Little Ones: TOUCH AND FEEL KITTEN; ALL OF BABY NOSE TO TOES by Victoria Adler with pictures by Hiroe Hakata; ABC LOOK AT ME by Roberta Intrater; ROAD WORK AHEAD by Anastasia Sve with pictures by Jannie Ho; RED WAGON by Renata Liwska; POUCH! By David Ezra Stein; LLAMA, LLAMA, RED PAJAMA by Anna Dewdney; SLEEP, BABY, SLEEP by Maryann Love with pictures by Maria Van Lieshout; and MAMA, MAMA by Jean Marzollo with pictures by Laura Regan;

 

Comics: I IS FOR IMAGE, Fall/Winter 2014 and POWER RANGERS TURBO VS. BEETLE BORGS METALLIX by Evan Skolnick.

 

Hardback Picture Books: MRS. FRIZZLE’S ADVENTURES: IMPERIAL CHINA by Joanna Cole with pictures by Bruce Degen; WE’RE BACK: A DINOSAUR’S STORY by Beverly Lazor-Bahr; and THE FUZZY DUCKLING (with lots of fuzzy places to touch on the pages) by Jane Werner with pictures by Deborah Borgo.

 

Also we’ve received a large donation of hardback picture books from the library, many of which are in wonderful condition and filled with gorgeous pictures. These are not for reading to very young children but would be great for reading aloud to pre-schoolers and older kids. There’s THE FAR-FLUNG ADVENTURES OF HOMER THE HUMMER (about a hummingbird and his mate) by Cynthia Reynolds with softly focused watercolors by Catherine McClung; RUGBY AND ROSIE by Nan Parson Rossiter; WHEN STORIES FELL LIKE SHOOTING STARS by Valiska Gregory with pictures by Stefano Vitale; LITTLE PINK PUP, the true story of a piglet adopted into a litter of puppies with adorable photos, by Johanna Kerby; HIROSHIMA NO PIKA, about the day the bomb fell on Hiroshima, by Toshi Maruki; and BASHO AND THE RIVER STONES and BASHO AND THE FOX (Basho was a great haiku master in 17th century Japan) by Tim Myers with pictures by Oki S. Han; and THE GYPSY PRINCESS by Phoebe Gilman. There are many, many more!

 

We also have several Chicken Soup for Little Souls. These are big picture books with simple stories appropriate for ages four and up with titles like THE BRAIDS GIRL and THE NEVER-FORGOTTEN DOLL.

 

Paperback Picture Books: ELEPHANT by Judy Allen with pictures by Tudor Humphries (this book has an important message about ivory poaching); SAMMY AND THE DINOSAURS by Ian Whybrow with pictures by Adrian Reynolds; MEET ME AT THE MOON by Gianna Marino; THIS MONSTER CAN’T WAIT by Bethany Barton; THE PRINCIPAL FROM THE BLACK LAGOON by Mike Thaler with pictures by Jared Lee; and many more!

 

Series Books: YANKEE BELLES IN DIXIE, THE SOLDIER BOY’S DISCOVERY and THE SECRET OF RICHMOND MANOR in the Bonnets & Bugles series by Gilbert Morris; JUNIE B. JONES IS CAPTAIN FIELD DAY and JUNIE B. JONES, FIRST GRADER (AT LAST) by Barbara Park; and DIARY OF A WIMPY KID: THE UGLY TRUTH by Jeff Kinney.

 

Intermediate Fiction: THE BLUE DOOR by Ann Rinaldi; YEAR OF NO RAIN by Alice Mead; TWELVE YEAR OLD VOWS REVENGE AFTER BEING DUMPED BY EXTRATERRESTRIAL ON FIRST DATE by Stephen Roos; PATTI’S PET GORILLA by Pat Mauser; DINOSAUR HABITAT by Helen Griffith; FANTASTIC MR. FOX by Roald Dahl; NERO CORLEONE: A CAT’S STORY by Elke Heidenreich; BUDDY by M. H. Herlong; WEIRD STORIES FROM THE LONESOME CAFÉ by Judy Cox; RAMONA THE GREAT by Beverly Cleary; and IRONCLAD: A TRUE STORY OF THE CIVIL WAR by Seymour Reit;

 

Non-Fiction: On the Western shelf in the children’s section, we have a copy of FREDERIC REMINGTON by Adeline Peters; we have many Eyewitness books from the library which will be selling for 15 cents and 25 cents and include TITANIC, WORLD WAR II, CRYSTAL & GEM, SHELL, DINOSAURS, ANCIENT GREECE and ANCIENT EGYPT; PYRAMIDS: A FASCINATING FACT FILE AND LEARN-IT-YOUSELF PROJECT BOOK by Peter Mellett; THREE PUZZLE STORIES FOR YOUNG READERS by Susannah Leigh; SIGNING FOR KIDS: THE FUN WAY FOR ANYONE TO LEARN AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE by Mickey Flodin; PIRATE MAZES and MUMMY MAZES by Don-Oliver Matthies; DREAMWORKS SHREK COOKBOOK from Dorling Kindersley (you won’t believe some of the yucky ideas in this one); ANIMAL BABIES by Melvin and Gilda Berger; and OPTICAL ILLUSIONS: AMAZING DECEPTIVE IMAGES, WHERE SEEING IS BELIEVING by Inga Menkhoff.

 

Children’s Biography: ORDINARY GENIUS: THE STORY OF ALBERT EINSTEIN by Stephanie McPherson; THURGOOD MARSHALL, MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR. and ALBERT SCHWEITZER, all by Carol Greene; EDGAR ALLAN POE by Suzanne Levert; and WHO WAS WALT DISNEY by Whitney Stewart.

 

Art Shelf: COME LOOK WITH ME: ART IN EARLY AMERICA by Randy Osofsky.

 

Folk Tales, Mythology & Story Collections: THE RANDOM HOUSE BOOK OF BEDTIME STORIES is a library withdrawal but a treasure when you open it up—beautiful all-color pictures by Jane Dyer and classic, beloved stories like Aesop’s THE LION AND THE MOUSE, Kipling’s HOW THE CAMEL GOT HIS HUMP, THE GINGERBREAD MAN, GOLDILOCKS AND THE THREE BEARS and many, many more.

 

Newbery Shelf: JUSTIN MORGAN HAD A HORSE by Marguerite Henry.

 

Classics: THE TALE OF PETER RABBIT by Beatrix Potter and MOBY DICK, a graphic version by Terry West of Herman Melville’s novel.

 

Beginning Readers: ARE YOU MY MOTHER by P. D. Eastman; AMELIA BEDELIA HELPS OUT by Peggy Parish; and from Scholastic News Non-Fiction Readers, Level 1 books on all nine planets, including the demoted Pluto.

 

On the wooden shelves we have displayed a number of Houghton Mifflin Leveled Readers. These are really for advanced, not beginning readers, and cover a number of subjects.

 

Young Adult & Intermediate Fantasy: DRAGONFLY by Alice McLerran; OTTO AND THE BIRD CHARMERS by Charlotte Haptie; THE BOOK OF ALFAR: A TALE OF THE HUDSON HIGHLANDS by Peter Hassinger; THE GRIMM LEGACY by Polly Shulman; and INKDEATH by Cornelia Funke.

 

Young Adult Fiction: OPHELIA by Lisa Klein.

 

American Indian Books for Children: THE NAVAJO by Andrew Santella; CELEBRATING THE POW-WOW by Bobbie Kalman; COME LOOK WITH ME: AMERICAN INDIAN ART by Stephanie Salomon; AHYOKA AND THE TALKING LEAVES, which tells the story of the creation of the Cherokee alphabet, by Peter and Connie Roop; THE FIREBRINGER: A PAIUTE INDIAN LEGEND by Margaret Hodge; COYOTE AND THE MAGIC WORD by Phyllis Root with pictures by Sandra Spiedel; KOKOPELLI’S FLUTE by Will Hobbs; and GROUNDHOG HORSE by Joyce Rockwood;

 

Library Events

 

Saturday, September 6 at 2 p.m. in the Library Auditorium

Come celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month with games, food and prizes.

 

Monday, September 8 at 11:30 a.m. in the Library Auditorium

Autism—What Can Be Done? Jasmine Booker with the Booker Bafol Autism Foundation of Learning will be the presenter.

 

Monday, September 8 at 6 p.m. in the Library Auditorium

The Forever Young Adult Book Club will meet to discuss WE WERE LIARS by E. Lockhart.

 

Tuesday, September 9 at 1 p.m. in the Library Auditorium

“Rio 2” with the voices of Anne Hathaway and Jesse Eisenberg

Rated G       101 minutes

 

Tuesday, September 9 at 6 p.m. in the Library Auditorium

Local Authors’ Fair. Some of the writers include David Barksdale, Ray Day, Barry Bernson, Gregg Seidl, Pam Peters, JoAnn Durgin, Brick Marlin, R. L. Thompson, Chris Kukoski and Becky Heishman.

 

Thursday, September 11 at 11 a.m. in the Library Auditorium

“Foreign Letters” directed by Ela Thier

Rated PG     99 minutes

 

Monday, September 15 at 6:30 p.m. in the Library Auditorium

Teatro Tercera Llamada, a Spanish theater group from Louisville, will present a portion of a play in Spanish.

 

Tuesday, September 16 at 1 p.m. in the Library Auditorium

“Mom’s Night Out” with Sean Astin and Patricia Heaton

Rated PG       98 minutes

 

Wednesday, September 17 at noon in the Library Auditorium

The Noon Book Club meets to discuss DAVID AND GOLIATH by Malcolm Gladwell.

 

Wednesday, September 17 at 6 p.m. in the Applegate Room

Monthly Make-It-and-Take-It Craft: Learn how to make a necklace using a washer and printed paper.

 

Thursday, September 18 at 11 a.m. in the Library Auditorium

“A Raisin in the Sun” with Sean Combs and Audra McDonald

Rated PG-13     131 minutes

 

Bilingual Book Discussion


New Albany-Floyd County Public Library is proud to announce we will be having a Bilingual Book Discussion!

Thursday, October 16, 2014

6:30pm in the Stressweg Auditorium

Join us for a bilingual book discussion/charla de libros on Thursday, October 16th at 6:30 in the Applegate Room.  We will be discussing Esperanza Rising by Pam Muñoz Ryan, an inspiring story of a young girl from Mexico who struggles to make a good life for herself and her mother in the United States.  There will be refreshments and a door prize.  Please register online for this event.  See the Reference Services Desk for copies of the book available in English and Spanish.  For more information call the Reference Services Desk at 949-3523.

Local Authors Fair


The New Albany-Floyd County Public Library is hosting a Local Authors Fair at 6:00 PM on Tuesday, September 9th in the Strassweg Auditorium. The public is invited to meet local authors of historical fiction, true crime, romance, fantasy, and more. Meet David Barksdale, Ray Day, Barry Bernson, Gregg Seidl, JoAnn Durgin, Pam Peters, Brick Marlin, R.L. Thompson, Christopher Kokoski and Becky Heishman. Ask them questions, hear about their new projects, and browse copies of their books available in the library and for purchase.

For more information, visit or call Reference Services at (812) 949-3523.

Forever Young Adult Book Club


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The New Albany-Floyd County Public Library is proud to announce the Forever Young Adult Book Club. Whether you’re in your teens, attending college, or are a young professional- we encourage you to be a part of this great new program at the library!

 

September will feature a discussion about “We Were Liars” by E. Lockhart. The Forever Young Adult Book Club will be held on September 8th in the Stressweg Auditorium. 

We hope that you can join us!

Questions? Call (812) 944-8464

Sept FYA

Do you have what it takes? Take the NAFC Library Card Challenge!


Did you know that September is National Library Card Sign-Up Month?

That’s right! The New Albany-Floyd County Public Library is hoping that you will take the Library Card Challenge!

No ice buckets involved here. And YOU can win great prizes!

It’s simple!

1) Just visit the NAFC Library in downtown New Albany at 180 W. Spring Street. 

2) Sign up for a new New Albany-Floyd County Public Library card.

3) You will receive a bookmark, along with a treat! Visit each of the departments and receive a stamp. Upon visiting each library department, you will be entered to win great weekly prizes. There will even be a grand prize, including $50 gift cards to be won at the end of September!

But this is about YOU, our patrons! So we invite you to post a short video with your New Albany-Floyd County Public Library card, along with why you think the NAFC Library is awesome!

Don’t forget to share it with us! You can email your video to Marketing Coordinator, Sarah Frost at sarahfrost@nafclibrary.org or tag us on social media!

Mention @NAFCPL on Twitter using #librarycardchallenge #NAFCPL

Tag us on Instagram @nafclibrary #librarycardchallenge

Select videos will be uploaded to the NAFC Library Facebook page! Don’t forget to share this challenge with your family and friends!

Will you be up for the #librarycardchallenege?

:)

Happy Reading Everyone!

Any questions or concerns about the #librarycardchallenge can be directed to sarahfrost@nafclibrary.org or please call the main library at (812) 944-8464.

 

Join us for a Hispanic Heritage Fiesta at the library!


Attention patrons!

Celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month at the New Albany-Floyd County Public Library.  September is Hispanic Heritage Month because several Latin American countries including Mexico gained their independence in the month of September.  To celebrate we are having a fiesta on Saturday, September 6th from 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.   We will have music, a Mexican dance troupe – Arcoiris Latino, food, activities for kids, door prizes, and a piñata.  Join us for an afternoon of fun!

 

For more information call the Reference Services Desk at 812-949-3523.

Hobbies & Crafts Reference Center


HobbiesCraftsRC_Masthead_WebThe Hobbies & Crafts Reference Center is a complete collection of information covering virtually every hobby and leisure activity. It offers detailed “how-to” instructions and creative ideas to meet the interests of virtually every hobby enthusiast. Full text is provided from leading hobby and craft magazines, including Bead & Button, Creative Knitting, FineScale Modeler, Quilter’s World and many more. It includes:

  • Full Text for more than 1,500 magazines and books
  • Access to more than 720 videos
  • Over 160 hobby profiles
  • More than 3,000 recipes from various health organizations

Categories covered include:

  • Arts & Crafts
  • Collecting
  • Home & Garden
  • Indoor Recreation
  • Kids’ Crafts
  • Model Building
  • Needlecrafts & Textiles
  • Outdoor Recreation
  • Performing Arts
  • Science & Technology
  • Scrapbooking & Papercrafts

The Hobbies & Crafts Reference Center is provided by the library for our patrons. All you need is your library card!